Five Friday Highlights: Tips for Going Global

Global Travel Recommendations

Have you traveled outside your native country? If so, were you surprised at the realities of a totally different place? No matter how many global travel recommendations you collect as you prepare to visit someplace where the language and customs differ from what you are accustomed to, there’s always a surprise or two.

There will always be a learning curve when you arrive in a new country and begin integrating yourself into society. Business Insider can help with the most important etiquette rules to know when traveling for business to 10 countries around the world. Having spent years in Germany, I can attest that a failure to be punctual can lead to even bigger failures in your business relationships; people from Germany value timeliness!

In 30 Intriguing Superstitions From Around the World from Mashable, beliefs are explained that you can only know by learning from a local (or reading an article like this). I can’t say any group in Spain has ever watched my entrance to the room to see which foot I entered with, but now that I know that entering a room with your left foot is considered bad luck, I’ll be sure to start things off on the right foot in the future!

Once you’ve gotten a handle on the etiquette and even figured out some of the superstitions, your work is still cut out for you! International Business Strategy: How to Succeed says it like it is: “It is a common misconception that conducting business internationally is the same as business as usual but expanded across multiple foreign countries or areas.” Global expansion is much more than geography.

Global expansion is much more than geography. {TWEET THIS}

If you were to make yourself a digital nomad, you may end up visiting each country mentioned in the “etiquette” and “superstitions” articles above. How do you feel about your office being your laptop and working from wherever you land for the day? In How Digital Nomads Make the World Their Oyster from DaPulseBLOG, a close look at the challenges and sacrifices of intentionally choosing not to have a fixed address and engaging in what the article calls “the ultimate downsizing exercise.”

Whether you never get your passport stamped or you’ve racked up so many frequent flyer miles you can’t keep up, remember that conversations are always global as explained by Gini Dietrich for Zignal Labs. “Even if you’re a company operating only in one country … events that are happening on the other side of the world could unexpectedly trickle down to the conversations you’re having with your customers.”

Have you read something this week that could prepare a traveler to hit the ground running in a new country? If so, tell me about it by clicking here!

Image Credit: 123rf Frank Blomberg

Five Friday Highlights: Facing Inequity

While the world today is still unfair, especially for women, it is still possible to knock down walls and make progress. Today, five highlights about the specifics of facing inequity as well as strategies for supporting one another.

We will not be able to fully address gender inequality until we understand it. Take some time to delve into A CEO’s Guide to Gender Inequality from McKinsey & Company. I share the frustration of the authors, who ask “why is progress so slow?”.

In this analytically written yet personally candid post, Gini Dietrich of Spin Sucks describes how Gender and Pay Inequality is Alive and Well in her professional world. Nothing quite helps illuminate inequity like details reinforced by facts and feelings.

One of the points Gini Dietrich made in her gender and pay inequality post, was ” there is nothing worse than another woman not supporting women.” In Career Restartup: Five Ways Women are Helping Each Other Get Back on Track, Betsey Guzior of BizWomen writes that “51 percent of working mothers — compared to 16 percent of working fathers — said they found it difficult to advance in their careers.” She proceeds to share five ways women who have taken extended leaves (such as parental leave) can re-enter the workforce successfully.

Although inequity still flourishes, we can help each other overcome it, one action at a time. {TWEET THIS}

Zooming out a bit from gender-based issues to general employee engagement concerns, I recommend The Role of Communication in Employee Experience and Employer Branding from Talent Culture. Nothing says it better than the second paragraph: “Clear workplace communication leads to team success.”

Lastly, this piece touches on my interests in communication, gender, and culture. If you have ever had to present to a multi-cultural audience, you may have discovered that what elicits hilarious laughter in the US may not have the same effect in Taipei! The suggestions in The Serious Business of Being Funny are excellent.

What have you read this week that made you think differently or laugh harder? Drop me a line at melissa@lamsonconsulting.com and let me know!

Image Credit: Fotolia Sergey Nivens