Five Friday Highlights: Diversity on Screen and Off

Diversity Issues

It is time for parents to teach young people early on that in diversity there is beauty and there is strength. ~ Maya Angelou

I ran across two articles about how diversity is represented in our popular culture recently. Whether you are a parent or simply a trusted adult in a young person’s life, someone is taking their cues from you about how to treat others who are different from them in some way. I am sharing those two articles here, and a few others that I encourage you to think about this week.

First, did you see the hashtag #CBSSoWhite on Twitter last month? If you did, here’s the backstory from CNN MoneyCBS Slammed for Lack of Diversity. Six of the network’s eight new shows star white actors, reports the article, which follows up by writing, “having transgender actress of color and ‘Orange is the New Black’ star Laverne Cox as a costar in the new legal drama ‘Doubt,’ and African American actor Justin Cornwell paired with Bill Paxton in the crime drama ‘Training Day,’ was not enough to overcome complaints that CBS lacks women and minorities on its roster”

On the flip side, Vogue celebrated the diversity in the 2016 Tony Awards nominee class in Hollywood, Take Notice: There is No #TonysSoWhite. “If their signature awards shows are any indication,” contends the article, “Hollywood could learn a thing or two from Broadway.”

There was another high profile “first” recently, when Deshauna Barber, an Army Reservist, won the Miss USA title. In this video from Business Insider, she talks about the skills the military taught her. She includes time management, discipline, and “extreme toughness.”

Whether you’re an actor or a soldier, you have to learn from those around you. Role Models and Mentors from Sharp Heels shares ten tips for learning by example and engaging more effectively with people you look up to at work. They are right when they say, “be coachable.”

Finally, although it is aimed at children, How to Teach Your Kids about Diversity from CW6 San Diego featuring Devin Hughes shares advice we should ALL heed. He encourages parents and children to “create space” to appreciate differences. Good advice for every one of us.

Have you read something this week that made a difference for you? Tweet me at @melissa_lamson1 and let me know!

Image Credit 123rf/rawpixel

3 Things CEOs Do to Run Successful Multi-Million Dollar Businesses Globally

Global Business

There are three moves business leaders make to take companies global (and make millions).

For example, they recruit competent talent:

Recruiting globally requires a whole different strategy than in the U.S. It must be tailored to fit the labor laws, culture, and societal perspective of that country. For example, during an interview in the U.S., personal questions about religion or family life are off-limits but are almost expected in Latin America.

In Europe, they’ll be more concerned with showing you certificates and degrees. In India, competition is so fierce, you may be confronted with a whole other set of challenges you didn’t expect.

To learn about the other two indispensable moves, please click here to read the entire article!

 

European Business

Image Credit: http://www.123rf.com/Daniil Peshkov

Five Friday Highlights: Traditions and Stereotypes

Global Stereotypes

Our world changes rapidly. Despite these accelerated changes, some deep-rooted global stereotypes persist as society evolves around them. Such is the case in this week’s selections. Venezuela and Brazil struggle to find lost power while stereotypes remain entrenched in Africa and Japan. Finally, a look at the world’s cities with the best work-life balance.

Venezuela Burning by Danielle DiMartino Booth explores the history behind Venezuela’s current crisis state. She asks, “How has Venezuela spiraled so far out of control in the wake of the commodities supercycle that built modern-day China, one that filled the coffers of resource-rich exporters worldwide?”

Challenging Africa’s Albino Stereotypes from the BBC explained the obstacles to acceptance people with albinism face in Africa. One woman (Celestine Mutinda) said, “Some of us are scared of walking along the streets of Nairobi. Sometimes while walking some people do say ‘this is money’. They believe that albinos can be sold. Some albinos end up isolating themselves because of discrimination.”

Adult Adoption in Japan from The Economist explains mukoyōshi, a practice almost unknown outside of Japan. This practice is one in which grown men are adopted by the families of the women they marry. This keeps the family line from ending and therefore prolongs their place in the business world. Read this fascinating article to learn about the 90% of adoptees in Japan: adults.

Finally, let’s learn about The 13 Cities With the Best Work-Life Balance in the World from Business Insider. Want to know which cities have the best balance between work and leisure time? Then this is the article for you! You’ll need to read it yourself to find out who is number one, but I’ll give you one hint: if you want great work-life balance, you’d better like Europe!

Have you read something this week that gave you a new perspective on another country? Email me to let me know!

Image Credit: 123rf/everythingpossible

3 Things Global Business Travelers Can’t Live Without (As Featured in Inc.)

Global Travel

There are three things I consider essential for global travel.

For example, I never leave on an international trip without vitamins:

The last souvenir you want to bring back from an otherwise productive trip is a head cold or unshakable fatigue. Taking vitamins can go a long way in fortifying yourself against germs. You are going to be in closely packed spaces, sharing more than the agenda. I rely on vitamins and two supplements: COLD-FX and Traumeel.

To learn about the other two indispensable items, please click here to read the entire article!

 

European Business

Image Credit: 123rf/HongqiZhang